UK CLL Forum, UKCLLFORUM

Possible breakthrough in gene therapy/immunotherapy

Topic Made On: Aug 10, 2011 11:08pm
Nick

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I had to post this wonderful news, this could lead to a true advance and an effective therapy. Early days, could this be the one? Understand if it is it would be a very long time away

According to the results of this very small gene therapy/immunotherapy trial overseas:

"Scientists are reporting the first clear success with a new approach for treating leukemia — turning the patients' own blood cells into assassins that hunt and destroy their cancer cells."

"It involved three with very advanced cases of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or CLL. The only hope for a cure now is bone marrow or stem cell transplants, which don't always work and carry a high risk "

Dr. Walter J. Urba of the Providence Cancer Center in Portland, Ore., called the findings "pretty remarkable" but added a note of caution because of the size of the study.

"It's still just three patients. Three's better than one, but it's not 100," said Urba, one of the authors of an editorial on the research that appears in the New England Journal.

What happens long-term is key, he said: "What's it like a year from now, two years from now, for these patients."

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44093725

From the New England journal:
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1103849#t=articleTop

From CLL Canada:
Highly Experimental - Modified T Cells Obliterate CLL Tumour Cells ...This is an highly experimental treatment of 3 CLL patients that transforms immune system cells into genetically engineered “serial killer” cells has produced dramatic results in three patients suffering from CLL.

Video and links:

CLL CANADA Homepage
http://cllcanada.ca

SChimeric Antigen Receptor–Modified T Cells in Chronic Lymphoid Leukemia
ource of study: http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/3/95/95ra73.abstract




Replied On: Aug 11, 2011 10:44am
Nick

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ABC world news gave this TV report also yesterday. OK the headline banner may be over exuberant but the report is balanced. Apparently they are saying that a genetically modified version of the HIV virus is injected into Patients T cells and then reintroduced back into their body. The American cancer society point out that the quality of remission needs to be assessed over time, and that the long term effect of these new cells also need to be monitored as they hang around for a while and may themselves cause damage? Still very encouraging. Who knows? I'm sure Professor Hamblin and the other Gurus will be publishing their take over the next few days , watch this space,

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory?id=14274742

An experienced overseas patient advocate for greater drug availability has a more pessimistic view. Remarking that if this does prove to be a successful strategy and can be developed into treatment it will take a considerable amount of time. For this to be taken up in the UK will require further development and time in assessment within trials, then consideration for approval. It may not prove to be a "silver bullet", but may lead on to much more specific therapy/intervention. It will be interesting to find out what is underway here in the UK within research in this area.

"this drug strategy attacks healthy B-cells just like Rituximab does. Thus, it will/may have some pretty serious downsides. Maybe/maybe not it will be as successful as Rituximab has been. tough to say with only 3 patients tested. I believe I am alive today only because of Rituximab. thus, lets get it developed ASAP if indeed it is this great and safe at the same time.

What is exciting way way way down the road is that this same technology maybe/possibly/hopefully can be used to attack specific cancerous targets that are specific to the cancerous B-cell and not the healthy B-cell. Pretty neat stuff but years from being around I'm afraid. I guess from that perspective it justifies some news coverage. Thus, yes, reason to be optimistic towards the future. How I wish this as so many of the other new stuff could become available sooner. Especially for those with no time left".






Replied On: Aug 11, 2011 06:44pm
Nick

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Cheya Vencat, has given her take on CLL Updates, on this work to date, and as usual has accompanied it with a lengthy lesson in understanding this area of medical science. With a lot of information. She is a great teacher. At:

http://updates.clltopics.org/3779-research-breakthrough

Professor Hamblin has written today about this trial on his blog spot, Mutations of Mortality, at:

http://mutated-unmuated.blogspot.com/2011/08/cure-for-cll-what-they-actually-did.html



Replied On: Aug 12, 2011 01:33am
Nick

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Professor Hamblin has added to his blog tonight

A cure for CLL - what do I think?

http://mutated-unmuated.blogspot.com/2011/08/cure-for-cll-what-do-i-think.html


" What is my verdict on it? I am excited by it but mainly because it is close to the field that I am working in, rather than as a treatment for today or even tomorrow. Remember, this is only a single case report and the remission has only lasted for about a year. We shall know more later, but it is an elegant approach to the problem. It is not a cure - yet.

I will still continue to advocate FCR for many patients and chlorambucil for some. Others will be more suited to Revlimid or to trials containg CAL-101 or PCI32765 for some time to come.

Finally, celluar therapy is extremely expensive. There will be few for whom it can be afforded, especially at present. "

He has also written these articles on this today:

More technical stuff. Omit if it isn't your things...

Cure (?) for CLL; What they actually did.

Cure for CLL. The Case Report

A new and successful treatment (cure?) for CLL



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